Banat

Surname Index (A-C)

Submitted by mivanyo on Wed, 12/28/2016 - 17:40
copyright 1996 by ZVA and FEEFHS; all rights reserved

Legend

  • Zichydorf --> First Zichydorf Colonists
  • Baptism ---> Zichydorf Roman Catholic Church Baptism Index
  • 11828LC ----> Zichydorf1828 Land Census Index 
  • Brazil ----> Zichydorf Emigrants to Brazil
  • Canada ----> Zichydorf Emigrants to Canada


Abender ... Baptism ... 1828LC
ABESK ... Zichydorf
ACHCZENER ... 1828LC
ACHTZEHNER ... Zichydorf ... Baptism
Achtzener ... Baptism ... 1828LC
Adam ... Baptism

Banat - Syrmien Towns

Donauschwaben villages in Yugoslavian Syrmien

It is not uncommon for a town or village to have names in three or more languages and sometimes there is more than one name in a single language as well.

Declination marks, such as umlauts are left off of this list.

Format: GERMAN/CURRENT(Serbian or Romanian)/HUNGARIAN

Banat - Slavonia towns

Germanb villages in Yugoslavian Kroatien / Salwonien

It is not uncommon for a town or village to have names in three or more languages and sometimes there is more than one name in a single language as well.

Declination marks, such as umlauts are left off of this list.

Format: GERMAN/CURRENT(Serbian or Romanian)/HUNGARIAN

Villages in Yugoslavian Baranja

Donauschwaben villages in Yugoslavian Baranja (Baranya)

It is not uncommon for a town or village to have names in three or more languages and sometimes there is more than one name in a single language as well.

Declination marks, such as umlauts are left off of this list.

Format: GERMAN/CURRENT(Serbian or Romanian)/HUNGARIAN

Banat Village Names

Declination marks so are left off of this list. After 1990, Romanian ortography has changed for the vowel ^i: in many cases (but not in all) it is now spelled ^a (like it was before 1950 or so). In this list, mainly the ortography before 1990 (i.e. with ^i like in Fintinele is used). In some newer maps some of the names may be spelled with ^a (i.e. Fantanele).

Banat - Batschka towns

Donauschwaben Batschka towns 

One of the special problems encountered by researchers working in South Eastern Europe is the multiplicity of languages. It is not uncommon for a town or village to have names in three or more languages and sometimes there is more than one name in a single language as well.